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Hanging on the wall at the church Ed Ruth attends back in Harrisburg is a big, blown up picture of himself featured in the local newspaper.

In January, the redshirt freshman climbed the national rankings to be the No. 2-ranked 174-pounder in the country, the pastor at that same church announced Ruth’s accolades to the congregation.

And any chance they get, Ruth’s family members gather around the television at home, flip on the Big Ten Network and watch Ruth cruise past opponent after opponent.

Start growing that mustache.

Zenagen Shampoo is partnering with the American Mustache Institute to hold a competition to see which college students can incorporate the best mustache into their Halloween costume -- male or female, real or fake.

Penn State is one of about 50 universities participating in the contest, said Sam Freeman, the contest's ambassador for Zenagen Shampoo.

One thing I've noticed is that it seems from my perspective that Edgardo's sets have been a little off tonight. He's still running the offense much better than in early January but every once in awhile a couple get away from him.

Penn State is starting to really take control of this set and has opened a 24-15 lead over Ohio State.

Sweitzer heads to the bench as Sherrick hits the court. He earned it, heck of a game from the man they call "Sweitz."

It seems like at least one Monday every other semester, Penn State students flock to the Bryce Jordan Center. It's not for a basketball game or a concert; rather, they pack the arena to catch a glimpse of the high-flying action of World Wrestling Entertainment.

I have never been there, only witnessed it on television. Maybe that is why I don't see what draws people to this so-called "sport." I guess the burly men rubbed down with baby oil would hold some appeal to certain people. As would the chanting and steel-chair wielding maniacs that enter the rings. Like I said, though, I have never gone.

I have witnessed college wrestling, though. I will be the first to admit that I was not a huge wrestling fan before, but I had seen some. After having taken in what college wrestling is all about, being there to witness these athletes put it all out there at Rec Hall, I am hooked. I am also convinced that this is the real wrestling.

Zak Young is a junior majoring in journalism and is a Collegian softball writer. His e-mail address is zjy100@psu.edu.

My Opinion

It seems like at least one Monday every other semester, Penn State students flock to the Bryce Jordan Center. It's not for a basketball game or a concert; rather, they pack the arena to catch a glimpse of the high-flying action of World Wrestling Entertainment.

Headlocks, body slams and broken tables will invade the Bryce Jordan Center tomorrow night, as World Wresting Entertainment returns to Penn State for the first time since March.

The event, which features wrestlers Triple H and Kane, will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are still available for the show and are $11 for Penn State students, said Bernie Punt, director of sales and marketing at the Bryce Jordan Center.

A lot has changed in the wrestling world since the WWE last appeared at the university. The most obvious change has involved the company's name, which switched from the World Wrestling Federation to World Wrestling Entertainment last May after the World Wildlife Fund won the exclusive rights to the logo from British courts.